Ethiopian Heirloom coffee

Vietnamese Coffee Exporter
Ethiopian-coffee

Ethiopian Heirloom – used to describe specialty coffee varieties, long in Ethiopia, but “ Heirloom ” is extremely vague and lacks definition, so this concept is gradually being replaced by “ Landrace ” or “ regional ” landraces ”

According to World Coffee Research, ” Landrace ” (as used when referring to the Arabica Landrace genetic group ) can be defined as a traditionally domesticated variety, locally adapted, of an established plant or animal species. evolved, through adaptation to the natural and cultural environments of local agriculture and isolation from other populations of the species.

Ethiopian-Heirloom-coffee
Coffee trees at Feleke Dukamo in Awassa, southern Ethiopia

“Heirloom” in plants

The word Heirloom describes an old plant grown for food. Some consider that a cultivar must be over 100 years old to be classified as Heirloom, others 50 years. And then, it is common to classify the Heirloom plant when it appeared before 1945, that is before the hybrid was introduced, or in 1951, when the hybrid was more widely available.

According to the Reference Guide to Ethiopian Coffee Varieties the term “ Heirloom ” is not quite right. In this context, the word is extremely vague and lacks the definition of how crop varieties have been selected, improved, and popularized by farmers over time.

Ethiopian-coffee
Coffee “Ethiopia Heirloom”

Coffee “Ethiopia Heirloom”

According to the perfect daily grind, in Ethiopia, we can classify Ethiopian coffee varieties into two types: JARC varieties and indigenous coffee varieties (“ regional landraces ”).

JARC varieties are varieties developed by the Jimma Agricultural Research Center, one of the federal agricultural research centers of Ethiopia, to increase pest resistance and yield. higher. There are about 40 of them. Indigenous coffee, on the other hand, is the type of coffee that grows wild in the forests of Ethiopia. It is estimated that there are more than 10,000 varieties of Arabica coffee among these.

This means that when a consumer holds a bag of Ethiopian coffee and sees the variety described as Heirloom, those beans come from some combination of more than 10,000 varieties.

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